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For a while I worked in the maker space at the university library and one my favorite things to do was troll “business bro” students.

They’d come in and look around, and you can always tell it’s them cause they wear blazers all the dam time. I’d watch them look around and finally ask if they needed help.

“Oh maybe, I don’t know if you can help me. I’m looking for... *hushed voice* ... a coder.”
“Oh yeah?” I’d murmur, matching their tone and seriousness. “We do coding tutorials, no worries, everyone starts somewhere, here let me pull up the tutor schedule...”

“Heh, no, no. I’m looking for a serious coder... for a business project.” They’d answer, suddenly puffing up.
“Ahh.” I’d nod solemnly. “Well, what kind of coder? I may have one in the back.”

“A good one.” They’d day, usually pulling up a chair.

“Yes but, what coding language?”

“Oh well I don’t know, that’s up to them.” They’d wave dismissively with one hand.
I’d nod again, pretending to take notes. “A good coder. I see. Well it depends on what you need...”

“It’s an APP!” (It’s always an app)

Sometimes I’d let them launch into their pitch, sometimes I’d cut them off.

Either way I’d say: “I see, and the salary you’re offering?”
This always got blank stares.

“What? No this is like a start-up thing.”

I’d nod, still pretending to take notes. “I see, so you’re offering 50% of the company.”

They’d shake their heads and go “What? No. I mean we’ll see if it makes money, but this is a great idea!”
Me: “So you are providing the idea and you want a coder to build it all, trouble shoot, test, maintain, and you’re doing... what exactly?”

Business Bro: “I’ll be handling the business side of things.”

Me: “That’s great. So, what salary are you offering again?”
Business Bro: “look this is a really exciting idea and I need a great coder to work on it and help bring it to life.”

Me: *scratching stuff out on my fake notes* “Hold on, you said you needed a good coder when you came in. Now you need a great coder?”
Business Bro: “I’ve got an idea for an app and I need someone to build it. It’s gonna be great.”

Me: “That’s awesome, starting salary for a senior app developer is 80k plus benefits.”

BB: “What?”

Me: “I mean, it’s a very in-demand skill set.”
Business Bro: “I don’t have that kind of money, but this idea is a million dollar idea if I can get someone to build it. I just need to put my ideas together with a coding genius to make it happen.”

Me: *putting down fake notes* “coding genius...?”
Me: *staring hard at business bro* So let me get this straight. You have an idea for an app that you’re convinced will be successful but you need someone else to build it. So you’re bringing the idea.

BB: exactly!

Me: what makes you think coders don’t have their own ideas?
Business Bro: *silence*

Me: so I’ve got an opening on Wednesday at 2pm with our JavaScript tutor, I recommend starting there. Unless you’ve never played around with HTML/CSS?

BB:

More from Erynn Brook

I want to talk about this thing.

No not Piers Morgan, I give no shits about him.

I mean this thing of criticizing women’s sensuality and then saying that they should get by on just their talent. Cause we see it everywhere...


And it comes up in a lot of different spaces:

And it comes up in a lot of different ways:

It’s interesting because we know that psychologically speaking, conventionally attractive people are better received.

Attraction can shift as you get to know someone on an individual level, but overall our society privileges people who look good.

I don’t understand the question?

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I run into this mindset a lot and it bugs me on so many levels, as an educator, as an internet person, as a communicator and as an introvert.


In fact most of my university time has been filled with this kind of rhetoric, mostly from professors, from laptop bans to full-on tirades about “back in my day”.

Which is especially fascinating given that almost all of my profs are boomers and according to the stats...

“Baby boomers spend 27 hours per week online, which is two hours more per week than those who are between 16 and

I like digital spaces. In some ways they feel more real, we don’t talk about how’s the weather and how’s your sister and all those annoying scripted conversation topics.

If I want to sit here and type a feminist rant I can; and I’m not going to get hauled off by the cops for disturbing the peace.

I can have deep, meaningful conversations and connections with people without navigating the sensory overload of public spaces.