BC

The best way to know if people like your product is NOT:

- Have a lot of emails in the waiting list
- Become #1 on PH
- Become #1 of HN or Reddit
- Have people that saing "I'll pay"
- Have a lot of free users

The best way to know if they're actually pay for it.

The only thing that matters is your product providing a value, and you can't know this until people will pay money for it.
We can have a first signal of a product/market fit after the launch by check how many sales we've got in the first 24h. Some scale:

200+ This has a high potential.
100+: This has a potential.
50+: Some people need it.
10+: People almost don't need it.
0+: People don't need it.
This is for a single time payment product. For a subscription probably it should be less because people hate subscription.

And obviously, you should have a lot of traffic like 3-5k+.
Here is a stat for my products (macOS apps) for the first 24h after the launch:
Justin Jackson @mijustin shared his SaaS benchmark:

Ask credit card upfront:
- Visitor to trial: 0.75% - 1%
- Trial to paid: 40% - 60%

Do not ask credit card upfront:
- Visitor to trial: 5%+
- Trial to paid: 8% - 20%
Here is one of the best example that I know for a single time payment product:

https://t.co/iyUSmsrFfH by @lukaszmtw and @PawelMag

First 24h stat:

- Visitos: 9,221
- Sales: 575
- Convertion rate from visitor to sale: 6.23%

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The YouTube algorithm that I helped build in 2011 still recommends the flat earth theory by the *hundreds of millions*. This investigation by @RawStory shows some of the real-life consequences of this badly designed AI.


This spring at SxSW, @SusanWojcicki promised "Wikipedia snippets" on debated videos. But they didn't put them on flat earth videos, and instead @YouTube is promoting merchandising such as "NASA lies - Never Trust a Snake". 2/


A few example of flat earth videos that were promoted by YouTube #today:
https://t.co/TumQiX2tlj 3/

https://t.co/uAORIJ5BYX 4/

https://t.co/yOGZ0pLfHG 5/